Heritage and decaying buildings

This page features a series of farm-houses that have been abandoned. They, and the land on which they stand, are all part of a much larger property owned by the MacAllan family.
Each of the buildings is now in the process of being documented before they collapse completely, and their history becomes irretrievable.

Last year I did quite a bit of work with the Woodchester history group, and was fortunate to gain access to many of the old farming properties.
Each property that I photograph seems to require at least 30 images to be made for just the buildings, so those below are just a very small "snapshot" of the coverage of some of the "built heritage" that I've had access to.

A number of these properties adjoin Red Creek Road. Although this road is little used (except by locals) now, in the late 1800s it formed part of the main road to the Victorian gold rush locations, with many thousands of pounds worth of gold being transported.
The road runs from near Wistow (a little East of Mount Barker), and for some distance, follows the Red Creek, aptly named because of the very red clay through which it winds. The Red Creek Post Office was obviously a "live-in" as indicated by the rather interesting bread oven - still in reasonably good condition.
The Ketley farm is located up near the top of the Red Creek escarpment, and the copious use of bluestone fences and walls, all built from the thousands of tonnes of surface rocks that were collected from the farming paddocks. Iron fittings have not lasted as well as the stonework (see the Ketley kitchen stove).
The Klenke farm pig sty has obviously been built from collected felled timber and roofed with finer timbers and straw. It still stays dry in all but the roughest of weather!

The Kutzer farm is most interesting for a number of reasons… The outside toilet is about 150m down the hill from the house, adjacent to an area that was full of fruit trees. The killing and butchering shed is further up the hill, about 50m closer to the house, while the bread oven is still is a mere 50m from the house!

I photographed the Werner property several years ago, and re-shot some of the images in May last year (2018). The current property holder contacted me only a couple of weeks later to ask it I'd got my photographs of the place… I asked why - and was informed that the night before a mini cyclone (probably only about 50M across) had roared through the property, ripping down 2 large eucalyptus trees, one of which demolished the kitchen chimney and fireplace, and destroyed part of the roof. One of the sheets of iron from the roof had been found across the main road, about 1Km away! - so I re-shot…

These farms are only some that I've photographed during the past year, and there appear to be many more waiting for my attention!

This page features a series of farm-houses that have been abandoned. They, and the land on which they stand, are all part of a much larger property owned by the MacAllan family.
Each of the buildings is now in the process of being documented before they collapse completely, and their history becomes irretrievable.

Last year I did quite a bit of work with the Woodchester history group, and was fortunate to gain access to many of the old farming properties.
Each property that I photograph seems to require at least 30 images to be made for just the buildings, so those below are just a very small "snapshot" of the coverage of some of the "built heritage" that I've had access to.

A number of these properties adjoin Red Creek Road. Although this road is little used (except by locals) now, in the late 1800s it formed part of the main road to the Victorian gold rush locations, with many thousands of pounds worth of gold being transported.
The road runs from near Wistow (a little East of Mount Barker), and for some distance, follows the Red Creek, aptly named because of the very red clay through which it winds. The Red Creek Post Office was obviously a "live-in" as indicated by the rather interesting bread oven - still in reasonably good condition.
The Ketley farm is located up near the top of the Red Creek escarpment, and the copious use of bluestone fences and walls, all built from the thousands of tonnes of surface rocks that were collected from the farming paddocks. Iron fittings have not lasted as well as the stonework (see the Ketley kitchen stove).
The Klenke farm pig sty has obviously been built from collected felled timber and roofed with finer timbers and straw. It still stays dry in all but the roughest of weather!

The Kutzer farm is most interesting for a number of reasons… The outside toilet is about 150m down the hill from the house, adjacent to an area that was full of fruit trees. The killing and butchering shed is further up the hill, about 50m closer to the house, while the bread oven is still is a mere 50m from the house!

I photographed the Werner property several years ago, and re-shot some of the images in May last year (2018). The current property holder contacted me only a couple of weeks later to ask it I'd got my photographs of the place… I asked why - and was informed that the night before a mini cyclone (probably only about 50M across) had roared through the property, ripping down 2 large eucalyptus trees, one of which demolished the kitchen chimney and fireplace, and destroyed part of the roof. One of the sheets of iron from the roof had been found across the main road, about 1Km away! - so I re-shot…

These farms are only some that I've photographed during the past year, and there appear to be many more waiting for my attention!

Ketley

Ketley

Werner

Werner

Ferries

Ferries

Red Creek PO

Red Creek PO

Kutzer

Kutzer

Klaebsch

Klaebsch